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The Alexandria Association is the city’s oldest organization devoted to the preservation of Alexandria’s historic buildings, landscapes, records, and antiquities; and to education in the decorative, fine, and building arts.
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Meetings are held at  8 pm
The Lyceum, 201 South Washington St. 
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
THE
ALEXANDRIA
ASSOCIATION
Established 1932
The Lyceum
 201 South Washington Street
Monday, November 20, 2017
  at 8 P.M​

ERIN KUYKENDALL THOMAS
"Philadelphia Carpenters, Cabinetmakers & Captains: The Working World of Thomas Nevell, 1762-1784"

MEMBERSHIP AND GUEST LIST IS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR. PLEASE REGISTER GUESTS WITH karen.paul2@verizon.net. Fee for guests attending a one-time lecture is $15. MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION AND CALENDAR AVAILABLE AT OUR SITE: ALEXANDRIAASSOCIATION.ORG. 

***** Snow Policy: In the event we must cancel a lecture at the last moment, we will attempt to notify you by email and post the cancellation on our site. If you do not have email, or do not see it on the site (as we may not have had enough time to get the message up), please phone the Lyceum to see if it is open, 703-838-4994, before starting out.

​Thomas Nevell (1721–1797), one of colonial Philadelphia’s most prominent master builders, designed and constructed significant public and private buildings, from the classically inspired Georgian mansion Mount Pleasant to the utilitarian cabinetmaking shop of Benjamin Randolph (1721–1791). Although Randolph’s shop has long since disappeared, architectural and documentary evidence shed light into Nevell’s business, Randolph’s line of furniture, and the wealthy patrons who made it possible. Woodworking artisans set high standard for fashionability and taste among the city’s consumers; their trades dramatically impacted the built environment. This lecture explores the professional and social world of Nevell and Randolph, and how the personalities of these two craftsmen changed the city.

Erin Kuykendall Thomas holds an undergraduate degree in History and Anthropology from The College of William and Mary (2002) and a Master's from the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture (2011). She also participated in the Attingham Summer School. After spending many summers working as an archaeologist at Jamestown with Preservation Virginia, Erin shifted her passion for colonial American history to the material world preserved above ground, and worked for the Department of Architectural History at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Mount Vernon, and the Reeves Collection of Chinese Export Porcelain at Washington & Lee University. She served as Curator of Collections for Tudor Place Historic House & Garden, where she led the preservation and interpretation of the museum's rich and varied decorative and fine arts collection. She has recently been appointed Adjunct Professor for the Smithsonian's MA Program in Decorative Arts & Design History, offered by the Corcoran School of the Arts & Design at the George Washington University.