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The Alexandria Association is the city’s oldest organization devoted to the preservation of Alexandria’s historic buildings, landscapes, records, and antiquities; and to education in the decorative, fine, and building arts.
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Meetings are held at  8 pm
The Lyceum, 201 South Washington St. 
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
THE
ALEXANDRIA
ASSOCIATION
Established 1932

MEMBERSHIP AND GUEST LIST IS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR. PLEASE REGISTER GUESTS WITH karen.paul2@verizon.net. Fee for guests attending a one-time lecture is $15. MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION AND CALENDAR AVAILABLE AT OUR SITE: ALEXANDRIAASSOCIATION.ORG. 

***** Snow Policy: In the event we must cancel a lecture at the last moment, we will attempt to notify you by email and post the cancellation on our site. If you do not have email, or do not see it on the site (as we may not have had enough time to get the message up), please phone the Lyceum to see if it is open, 703-838-4994, before starting out.

Norfolk was the largest city in Virginia, and the eighth largest in Colonial America, on the eve of the American Revolution. It possessed one of the finest natural harbors in the world, and served as the seat of commerce for the larger Chesapeake. The colony’s extensive export of tobacco, combined with a tremendous trade in naval stores, pork, and timber propelled society in Norfolk and the nearby countryside to a vaunted position as one the wealthiest in English-speaking North America.
On New Years day 1776, Lord Dunmore and the British Navy bombarded Norfolk’s waterfront, setting fire to perhaps a third of the city. Shortly afterwards, with permission from the House of Burgesses, Colonial Virginians torched the remainder of the metropolis to prevent the strategic port and warehouses filled with supplies from falling into enemy hands. The final tally of losses came to 1333 homes and other structures burned to the ground, with “12 buildings left standing on the north side of town.” The loss comprised the most thorough destruction of any city in English speaking North America.
Despite the popular myth that little survives from early Norfolk, evidence makes it possible to reconstruct a view of the city’s highly developed colonial cabinet trade. Sumpter Priddy will share with us his decades of observation and research that illumine how the city's distinct populace and international commerce influenced tastes and furniture styles there and in the surrounding countryside. 
Sumpter Priddy, III holds an undergraduate degree in the History of Architecture from the University of Virginia and an MA from the Winterthur Program in Early American Material Culture. He taught architecture and decorative arts for Historic Deerfield’s Summer Fellowship Program (1976) and served as teaching curator for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (1978-1983). Since establishing his Alexandria gallery in 1983, he has focused upon researching Southern regional culture and artifacts. Many of us know Sumpter through his gracious hosting of Alexandria Association Study Tours!
Monday February 19, 2018
The Lyceum
201 South Washington Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
8 P.M.
SUMPTER PRIDDY
“The Baroque Furniture of Norfolk and the Lower James River Region, 1680- 1775”