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The Alexandria Association is the city’s oldest organization devoted to the preservation of Alexandria’s historic buildings, landscapes, records, and antiquities; and to education in the decorative, fine, and building arts.
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THE
ALEXANDRIA
ASSOCIATION
Established 1932


***** Snow Policy: In the event we must cancel a lecture at the last moment, we will attempt to notify you by email and post the cancellation on our site. If you do not have email, or do not see it on the site (as we may not have had enough time to get the message up), please phone the Lyceum to see if it is open, 703-838-4994, before starting out.


​Speaker:
BROCK JOBE

“Sold!: The Most Valuable Furniture Ever Offered at Auction” 


Monday, February 21, 2022
The Lyceum, 201 South Washington Street
at 7 P.M.!!!!!   NOTE new start time!!!


Please note new start time: Lite refreshment at 7 PM in lecture hall, lecture at 7:30. Masks required when in the common hallways, entrance hall, and restrooms. Masks and social distancing, as appropriate, encouraged in lecture hall. We can do this safely!!!!!


PLEASE REGISTER GUESTS WITH karen.d.paul1948@gmail.com. Fee for guests attending a one-time lecture is $10. MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION AND CALENDAR AVAILABLE AT OUR SITE: ALEXANDRIAASSOCIATION.ORG  In the event we must cancel a lecture at the last moment, we will attempt to notify you by email and post the cancellation on our site. 

Please note that the lecture of January 17th has been cancelled due to rising Omicron infections. Calder Loth’s talk “Palladio's Influence on American Architecture” has been rescheduled for Monday May 16th. As of press time, we are planning to resume lectures in February.
Please join us to welcome Brock Jobe, Winterthur’s Professor of American Decorative Arts Emeritus, as he recounts the promotion, intrigue, and competition that led to record prices for six of the world’s greatest masterpieces of furniture-making. 

 From an Italian cabinet owned by an English Duke that sold for over $36 million to a French Art Deco armchair that brought more than $28 million, each piece has a fascinating story behind its price tag. 

Learn how these items found their way to market, why they fetched what they did, and where they are today. Along the way, discover the excitement that propelled these exceptional objects to new heights in the marketplace and learn about the people who participated in these sales (the sellers, buyers, and auction house personnel) and of course the objects of desire themselves.